Snickers' new campaign: Is this actually working on anyone?

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I knew it was coming. Thanks to the New York Times, I had a chance to prepare mentally for the onslaught of Snacklish. I’m not confident it was enough.

They come at you in the mornings and afternoons as you stand at the train and bus stops. They cause freeway traffic to slow down as people struggle to interpret the billboards. The familiar brown, red and blue logo that should say SNICKERS, but instead says something nearly intelligible.

For those of you fortunate enough not to have been exposed to this yet, here’s Stuart Elliot of the NYT to break it down for you:

Snacklish is a humorous way of speaking that revises everyday words and phrases for a Snickers-centric world. To underscore their origin, they are printed in the typeface and colors of the Snickers brand logo.

For instance, the basketball great Patrick Ewing becomes Patrick Chewing. Combine the rapper Master P with the peanut, a main ingredient of Snickers, and he turns into Master P-nut — perhaps a hip-hop relation of the Planters brand mascot, Mr. Peanut.

Other examples include a Snickers taxi, or snaxi; peanutarium, for planetarium; and chompensation, for compensation. And the Sigma Nu fraternity is transformed into Sigma Nougat, after another Snickers ingredient.

I’m supremely irritated by the campaign, but I must admire it for it’s effectiveness. Relying purely on familiarity with the logo, your eye is drawn to each ad, and held there against your will as your mind attempts to puzzle out the silly little word game.

And whether or not you wanted to, you’ve spent precious seconds thinking about Snickers bars.

Well played, Mars. Well played.

Links

The Vocabulary of Snacking, Lightly Sweetened

Snickers.com